This isn't Josh's first time abroad. Heck, it ain't even his first African rodeo. However, Sudan is not The Gambia (lovingly referred to as "Africa for beginners"), nor is his new job the Peace Corps (or, perhaps more fittingly, Summer Camp for College Grads). No, this is going to be far tougher a job, but it will also be more rewarding. Hopefully for the reader it will be more hilarious too.

Come along and follow Josh through his travels and travails, his perils and pleasures. Read all about Josh's adventures in his new career in the world's newest country, Southern Sudan.

22nd April 2011

Question

conmigo said: Oh dear lord, is that a cheetah blanket underneath all that booze and batteries? You might be able to get one of those in Africa, no?

That is a cheetah blanket, but I cannot be blamed with purchasing it. While I may be able to get an authentic cheetah rug, I know a lot of people that would be pretty pissed at me if I did.

22nd April 2011

Question

swissah said: so, how was the flight?

The flight was as good as can be expected.  No major delays, only one crying baby.  I’m always amazed at how much better the service and food is on international, especially European, flights compared to domestic.  

17th April 2011

Photo

What to bring to South Sudan?  
Despite the packing list so thoughtfully provided by my new employer, this was not an easy question to answer.  While I anticipate having to travel to Nairobi from Rumbek every so often, I don’t know when I will first get a chance to go there.  As such, simple day-to-day items such as toothpaste and batteries are battling for space against necessities (to me) like my shortwave radio and a fine bottle of bourbon.
Fortunately I went through all of this with the Peace Corps and have a better understanding of what can be left behind.  Whoever told me prior to my Peace Corps departure to bring tupperware and spices was a fool.  And my new Kindle is ideal for international travel, as I’ve managed to cram 50 or so books into its nine ounces.
As my final departure draws closer I’m beginning to feel that familiar mix of nausea and adrenalin caused by fear, excitement, and wonder.  Although I know a handful of people that worked or have worked in East Africa, I’m still at a loss as to what to expect.  Not trying to make myself a martyr, but there are some serious health and security concerns I will have to deal with over there.  That said, anyone that knows me knows a lifelong ambition of mine is to be more Indiana Jones-like, a pursuit hindered by my previous 9 to 5 office job.  Adventures are all about taking some risks, so let’s get moving on this one!

What to bring to South Sudan?  

Despite the packing list so thoughtfully provided by my new employer, this was not an easy question to answer.  While I anticipate having to travel to Nairobi from Rumbek every so often, I don’t know when I will first get a chance to go there.  As such, simple day-to-day items such as toothpaste and batteries are battling for space against necessities (to me) like my shortwave radio and a fine bottle of bourbon.

Fortunately I went through all of this with the Peace Corps and have a better understanding of what can be left behind.  Whoever told me prior to my Peace Corps departure to bring tupperware and spices was a fool.  And my new Kindle is ideal for international travel, as I’ve managed to cram 50 or so books into its nine ounces.

As my final departure draws closer I’m beginning to feel that familiar mix of nausea and adrenalin caused by fear, excitement, and wonder.  Although I know a handful of people that worked or have worked in East Africa, I’m still at a loss as to what to expect.  Not trying to make myself a martyr, but there are some serious health and security concerns I will have to deal with over there.  That said, anyone that knows me knows a lifelong ambition of mine is to be more Indiana Jones-like, a pursuit hindered by my previous 9 to 5 office job.  Adventures are all about taking some risks, so let’s get moving on this one!